McKMAC to discuss proposed rules for growing ‘medicine’ outdoors

The McKinleyville Municipal Advisory Committee (McKMAC) will convene this week to discuss wacky weed and a proposed ordinance for regulating outdoor medical marijuana grows.

The McKMAC meets at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, April 24 at the Azalea Conference Center, 2275 Central Avenue. If you plan to attend and have never been to the Azalea Conference Center, don’t look for a building that looks like a conference center, because you won’t find one. Instead, near the rear of the McKinleyville Middle School campus you’ll find what looks like a classroom with tables and chairs. That’s the so-called conference center. But, hey, it’s nice and clean and the acoustics are pretty good, so why complain about the name?

The first order of business is for the McKMAC to review and approve the minutes from the previous meeting. Those minutes are kept my McKMAC secretary Tim Hooven, who spends the meetings pecking away on some sort of electronic device, It was previously reported that Hooven was using an iPad, but this reporter was wrong. It’s some other kind of tablet device.
The McKMAC will then take public comments. Anyone can speak out on just about anything, as long as it has to do with McKinleyville and the McKMAC.

After that it will be time for the McKMAC to learn about the county’s proposed ordinance for regulating the outdoor growing of medical marijuana. A good portion of Humboldt County residents have a chronic illness which requires regular dosages of THC to keep them well. For some reason they never recover from their ailments, so the treatments must continue day after day as they giggle and wolf down bags of Cheetos and wait for a permanent cure.
In McKinleyville, most of the medicine is grown in garages and bedrooms filled with metal halide or high pressure sodium grow lights. The grow houses stretch from one end of town to the other, in both the low-rent and high-rent Mack Town neighborhoods. If you want to know where they are, use your nose.

There are not a lot of outdoor grows in McKinleyville, but there are a few here and there. Those growers who want to follow the law, and who grow outside, could be impacted by the proposed ordinance.
County representatives will be on hand at the McKMAC meeting to explain the ordinance, growing requirements, plant counts and enforcement options. The McKMAC will have an opportunity to weigh in on the proposed ordinance.

The public also has an opportunity to give input. If you can’t attend the meeting, or would rather just write a letter, you can send an email to mckinleyvillemac@gmail.com.

 

 

 

 

One thought on “McKMAC to discuss proposed rules for growing ‘medicine’ outdoors

  1. “A good portion of Humboldt County residents have a chronic illness which requires regular dosages of THC to keep them well. For some reason they never recover from their ailments, so the treatments must continue day after day as they giggle and wolf down bags of Cheetos and wait for a permanent cure.”

    Thanks, I got a pretty good chuckle from that, and that’s even without any medicinal mood assistance of either the herbal kind or the prescription pills in a bottle kind.

    I don’t think anyone seriously believes that any more than a small fraction of the cannabis grown in Humboldt is actually intended for personal or local use. Clearly it’s a cash crop. If it’s being grown by a collective, with all the proper documentation, then it’s legal under state law. But my guess is that less than 5% of the grows in the county are in that category, and even less than that when you’re talking about McKinleyville garages and backyards.

    But for law enforcement, local politicians, the owners of the many local businesses that are largely reliant on the industry, and the nearly all local businesses that benefit from the purchasing power this cash crop brings into the county — and for that matter, for most of the public — it’s generally treated as a wink-wink, look the other way situation unless the particular grower in question is causing other problems for their neighbors or in the community

    And in a way, that probably is the most rational response to the situation in which we find ourselves, where most people in the county really don’t care whether other people choose to use and/or grow cannabis, including growing it for profit, as long as they’re not negatively impacting their neighbors by doing so. Yes, it’s a bit silly for everyone to have to keep playing the game of pretending that they’re planning on consuming all those pounds of cannabis themselves, unless someone can prove otherwise. A bit silly, but much less harmful to society than locking people up when they’re not really doing any real harm to the community.

    So that’s the position the County is in, and thus it does make some sense to mostly focus on potential nuisances, rather than on the activity itself.

    My prediction is that within a couple of years, California will legalize, tax, and regulate cultivation and sale for non-medical purposed, and the indoor residential growspace phenomenon will quickly vanish, crushed by competition from large indoor warehouse grows with much greater economies of scale, and by greenhouse and outdoor grows. At that point a “small” grow will probably mean a couple of hundred plants outdoors or in greenhouses, and even still, probably not very many people will be able to make a go of it. Large, industrial-ag style grows will meet 90% of the demand, and the smaller “craft” growers will be competing over the remaining 10% of the market. It could still be a significant revenue stream for Humboldt County, but not at the garage or backyard scale.

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